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Full text of "Douland's Musical banquet"

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DOULANDS 




MUSICAL BANQUET. 



BY CHARLES WHITTINGHAM. 



MDCCCXVII. 




25 Copies only printed. 





















^V DOULAND'S 




MUSICAL BANQUET. 



BY CHARLES WHITTINGHAM. 




MDCCCXVII. 



__ 

Q5 Cr-jjies only -printed. mf^ 

— — ~m>%> 



A 

MUSICAL BANQUET, 

FURNISHED WITH VARIETIE OF DELICIOUS 

AYRES, 

COLLECTED OUT OF THE BEST AUTHORS; 

En €nglisi), Jtomf), Spanish an* Italian. 
BY ROBERT DOULAND. 



LONDON: PRINTED FOR THOMAS ADAMS. 

1610.— FOLIO. 



In the above curious, and I may add, very 
rare little volume, as it was unknown both 
to Hawkins arid Burney, the reader will hail 
with pleasure some spirited and interesting 
verses by the unfortunate favourite of Elizabeth, 
which give him a better title to a place among 
the noble poets than any thing which has 
hitherto been printed by his biographers, or 
those who have mentioned his talent for verse. 
The gallant Earl of Cumberland, and Sir 

A 



2 douland's musical banquet. 

Henry Lea, are, I believe, here also, for the 
first time, introduced to the notice of the po- 
etical antiquary, as claiming their place in the 
list of poets of that golden age. 

s. w. s. 



Prefixed is a dedication to Sir Robert Sid- 
ney, in which Robert Douland calls him his 
Godfather, says he was named after him, and 
proceeds thus : — " The love that you beare to 
all excellent and good learning (which seem 
hereditarie above others to the noble family 
of the Sidneys) and especially to this excellent 
science of Musicke, a skill from all antiquity 
entertained with the most noble and generous 
dispositions." 

After which follows a short Address " To 
the Reader" — Gentlemen : Finding myself 
not deceived in the hope I had of your kinde 
entertayning my collection of Lute Lessons 
which I lately set foorth, I am further en- 
couraged to publish unto your censure these 
Ayres, being collected and gathered out of the 



douland's musical banquet. 3 

labours of the rarest and most judicious Mais- 
ters of Musick that either now are or have 
lately lived in Christendome, whereof some 
I have purposely sorted to the capacitie of 
young practitioners, the rest by degrees are of 
greater depth and skill, so that like a carefull 
confectionary, as neere as might be I have 
fitted my Banquet for all tastes ; if happily I 
shall be distasted by any, let them know what 
is brought unto them is drest after the English, 
French, Spanish, and Italian manner : the 
assay is taken before, they shall not need to 
feare poisoning. You gentlemen and friends 
that come in good will, and not as promooters 
into a country market, to call our viands into 
question, whatsoever here is, much good may 
it doe you, I would it were better for you : for 
the rest I wish their lips such lettuce as Silenus 
Asse, or their owne harts would desire. 

Thine, 
ROBERT DOULAND. 



A 2 



DOULAND S MUSICAL BANQUET. 



AD ROBERTUM DOULANDUM 

Joannis * Filiwm de Musico suo convivio. 

Ergone divini genitalis plectra rcsumis, 
Reddat ut attonitos iterum lua Musa Britannos? 
Ut liimia totum rapias dulcedine mundum, 
Doulandi & resonet nomen ncmus omne, superbam 
Qua mundi dominam vaga Tibridis alluit unda; 
Littora qua rutilis verrit Pactolus arenis, 
Aut sese immiscct glaciali Vistula ponto, 
Vinccre quern nequeatLiNVS,necThracius Orphevs, 
Credo equidem, ut nostras demulcet Entheus aures. 
Somnio Threicidum voces, & murmura cosli 
Antiquosque modos, redivivaque ; Dorica castra, 
Illius ut vario cantillet gutture Musa, 
Macte animo Roberte tuo, charique parentis 
Pergito candorem, moresque imitarier artes 
Auspiciisque bonis celebret te fama per orbem 
Eunera post Patris Phcenixque renascitor alter. 

HENRICUS PEACHAMUS. 



* It was to John Douland the verses in Shakspeare's Pas- 
sionate Pilgrim were addressed; and Peacham, in his Minerva, 
has a device, and verses both English and Latin inscribed to 
him. 



For the satisfaction of the Reader 1 here subjoin " The 
Table of Contents" of this Rare Volume. 

Sir Robert Sidney, his Galliard. John Douland. 

* My heavy sprite, opprest with sorrow's ) 

mi it \ Anton y Holborne - 

The words by the Rt. Hon. George Earl 
of Cumberland. 

* Change my mind since she doth change. Richard Mai tin. 
The words by the Rt. Hon. the Earl of 

Essex, Earl Marshall. 

* O eyes leave off your weeping. Robert Hales. 
Author of the words unknown. 

Goe my flocke, get you hence. D'Incerto. 

The words by Sir Philip Sidney. 

O deere life when shall it be. Ditto. 

The ivords by Sir Philip Sidney. 

* To pleade my faith, where faith hath no ) 

, } Daniel Batch el ar. 

reward. y 

The words by Robert, Earl of Essex. 

In a grove most rich of shade. Tesseir. 

The words by Sir Philip Sidney. 

* Farre from triumphing court, John Douland. 
The words by Sir Henry Lea. 

* Lady, if you so spight me. Ditto. 
Author of the words unknown. 

* In darknesse let me dwell. Ditto. 
Author of the words unknown. 



6 



DOULANb's MUSICAL BANQUET. 



FRENCH AIRES. 



* Si le parler et le silence. Airs du Court 

Cepenserqui sans fin tiranniseraa vie 
Vous que le bonheur r'apelle. 



; du Court. ~\ 
Ditto. V D' 

Ditto. J 



Incerto. 



SPANISH. 



Passava amor su arco dessarmado 
Sta notte mien yava 
Vestros ojos tienen d'Amor. 



$ 



D'Incerto. 



ITALIAN. 



Se di farmi morire 
Dovr6 dunque morire? 
Amarilli mia bella 
O bella piu piu. 



Dominico Maria Megli 
Guilio, Cacciori detto Romano. 
Ditto. 
Ignoto. 



Those pieces marked with a Star are given in the following 



pages. 



DOULAND S MUSICAL BANQUET. 



BY 



GEORGE, EARL OF CUMBERLAND. 



My heavy sprite, opprest with sorrow's might, 
Of wearied limbs the burthen sore sustains, 
With silent groans and heart's tears still complains, 
Yet I breathe still and live in life's despight. 

Have I lost thee ? all fortunes I accurse, 
Bids thee farewell, with thee all joys farewell ; 
And for thy sake this world becomes my hell. 



8 douland's musical banquet. 



BY 



ROBERT, EARL OF ESSEX. 

€arl Jttarstyal of CBnglanti 



Change thy mind since she doth change, 
Let not Fancy still ahuse thee : 
Thy untruth cannot seem strange, 
When her falsehood doth excuse thee ; 
Love is dead and thou art free, 
She doth live, but dead to thee. 

Whilst she lov'd thee best awhile 

See how she hath still delay'd thee : 

Using shews for to beguile, 

Those vain hopes that have deceiv'd thee ; 

Now thou seest, although too late, 

Love loves truth, which women hate. 



"V 



douland's musical banquet. 9 

Love no more since she is gone, 
She is gone, and loves another: 
Being once deceiv'd by one, 
Leave her love, but love none other. 
She was false, bid her adieu, 
She was best, but yet untrue. 

Love, farewell — more dear to me 
Than my life which thou preservest : 
Life, all joys are gone from thee, 
Others have what thou deservest; 
Oh, my death doth spring from hence, 
I must die for her offence. 

Die ! but yet before thou die 
Make her know what she has gotten : 
She in whom my hopes did lie, 
Now is chang'd, I quite forgotten. 
She is chang'd, but changed base, 
Baser in so vilde a place. 



JO DOULAND'S MUSICAL BANQi I 



BY THE SAME. 



To plead my faith, where faith hath no reward, 
To move remorse, where favour is not borne ; 
To heap complaints, where she doth not regard, 
Were fruitless, bootless, vain, and yield but scorn. 

I loved her whom all the world admir'd, 
I was refus'd of her that can love none, 
And my vain hope, which far too high aspir'd, 
Is dead and buried, and for ever gone. 

Forget my name since you have scorn'd my love, 
And, woman like, do not too late lament, 
Since for your sake, I do all mischief prove, 
I none accuse, nor nothing do repent. 

I was as fond as ever she was fair, 

Yet lov'd I not, more than I now despair. 



douland's musical banquet. il 



AUTHOR UNKNOWN. SET BY ROBERT HALES. 



Eyes leave off your weeping, 
Love hath the thoughts in keeping 

That may content you ; 
Let not this misconceiving, 
Where comforts are receiving 

Causeless torment you. 

Clouds threaten but a shower, 
Hope hath his happy hour 

Though long in tasting; 
Time needs must be attended, 
Love must not be offended 

With too much hasting. 

But oh the painful pleasure, 
Where love attends the leisure 

Of life's wretchedness : 
Where hope is but illusion, 
And fear is but confusion 

Of Love's happiness. 



12 douland's musical banquet. 

But happy hope that seeth 
How hope and hap agreeth, 

Of life deprive me, 
Or let me be assured 
When life hath death endured, 

Love will revive me. 



AUTHOR OF THE WORDS UNKNOWN. 

SET BY JOHN DOULAND. 



Lady, if you so spite me, 

"Wherefore do you so oft kiss and delight me ? 

Sure, that my heart opprest and overcloyed 

May break thus overjoyed ; 

If you seek to spill me 

Come kiss me sweet and kill me : 

So shall your heart be eased, 

And I shall rest content, and die well pleased. 



douland's musical banquet. 13 



BY SIR HENRY LEA. 



Far from triumphing court and wonted glory, 
He dwelt in shady unfrequented places, 
Time's pris'ner now, he made his pastime-story, 
Gladly forgets courts erst afforded graces, 
That Goddess, whom he served, to heav'n is gone, 
And he on Earth in darkness left to moan. 

But, lo, a glorious light from his dark rest 
Shone from the place where erst this Goddess 

dwelt, 
A light whose beames the world with fruit hath 

blest; . 
Blest was the Knight while he that light beheld : 
Since then a star fix'd on his head hath shined 
And a Saint's image in his heart is shrined. 

Bavish'd with joy so grac'd by such a Saint, 
He quite forgot his cell, and self denied 
He thought it shame in thankfulness to faint, 
Debts due to Princes must be duly paid : 



14 douland's musical banquet. 

Nothing so hateful to a noble mind 

As finding kindness, for to prove unkind. 

But ah, poor Knight, though thus in dream he 

ranged, 
Hoping to serve this Saint in sort most meet, 
Time with his golden locks to silver changed 
Hath with age-fetters bound him hands and feet; 
Aye me, he cryes, Goddess my limbs grow faint, 
Though I times prisoner be, be you my Saint. 



» 
AUTHOR UNKNOWN. SET BY JOHN DOULAND. 



In darkness let me dwell, the ground shall sorrow 

be 
The roof despair, to bar all cheerful light from me, 
The walls of marble black, that moistened still 

shall weep, 
My music, hellish jarring sounds to banish friendly 

sleep. 
Thus wedded to my woes, and bedded to my tomb, 
Oh, let me living die, 'till death do come. 



douland's musical banquet. 15 



/ cannot resist the temptation of transcribing the following 
elegant little French Song, which appears to have been taken 
from a collection intitled " Airs du Cour ;" neither the au- 
thor of the words or music appear to have been known to 
Douland. 



Si le parler et le silence, 

Nuit a notre hem* egalement, 

Parlons done, ma chere esperance, 

Du cceur et des yeux settlement : 
Amour, ce petit Dieu volage, 
Nous apprend ce muet langage. 

Que le regard vole et revole 

Messager de nos passions, 

Et serve au lieu de la parole 

Pour dire nos intentions. — Amour, &c. 

Mais si quelque ame offencee 

De nous voir discourir des yeux, 

Nous parlerons de la pensee 

Comme les anges dans les cieux. — Amour, &c. 



16 douland's musical banquet. 

Ainsi par un doux artifice 

Nous trornperons les courtisans, 

Et nous rirons de la malice 

De mille faclieux medisans, 

Qui n'en scauront pas d'avantage 
Ignorant ce muet langage. 




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